Terra Trevor is a writer who draws from her Native roots and the natural world. Her stories illuminate our humanity, remind us to be open, to connect, to hope, to question, or bring change. She is known for works in which she uses imagery and lyric prose to address spirituality, family ties, her identity as a mixed-blood and her connection to the landscape. 

She is the author of Pushing up the Sky, a memoir and a contributor to 10 books, including The People Who Stayed: Southeastern Indian Writing After Removal (University of Oklahoma Press), and Children of the Dragonfly: Native American Voices On Child Custody and Education (The University of Arizona Press). 

Her work and portrait is featured in Tending the Fire: Native Voices and Portraits (University of New Mexico Press). Her work also has appeared in News From Native California (Heyday Books), Voices Confronting Pediatric Brain Tumors (Johns Hopkins University Press), and in numerous other books, anthologies and literary journals online. 
Author photo by Chris Felver. Landscape photo by John Simpkins.




“Terra Trevor’s ‘Pushing up the Sky’ is a revelation of the struggles and triumphs packed into the hyphens between Korean and Native American and American. From her, we learn that adoption can best be mutual, that the adoptive parent needs acculturation in the child’s ways. With unflinching honesty and unfailing love, Trevor details the risks and heartaches of taking in, the bittersweetness of letting go, and the everlasting bonds that grow between them all. With ‘Pushing up the Sky’ the ‘literature of adoption’ comes of age as literature, worthy of an honored place in the human story.” 
—Robert Bensen 
editor of Children of the Dragonfly: Native American Voices on Child Custody and Education (The University of Arizona Press) 

Terra is at work on a collection of stories tracing her journey as a young woman into elder hood. Pushing up the Sky tells her motherhood story of challenge, joy and deep loss. Her current work-in-progress focuses on love and friendships with the elder Native women who came into her life after that difficult period. Over three decades, these women lifted her from grief, instructed her in living, and showed her how to age from youth into beauty. Reflections on the deep power of female friendship, on losing a child, reconciling complicated roots, and finding richness in living every stage of life.